🇯🇵 Tsukiji Fish Market, Ginza, & Roppongi

This post is the tenth in a series on our honeymoon trip in Japan. My previous post was about Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea, with some helpful tips, and prior to that I recounted our experience at a themed maid café. You can find all our honeymoon-related posts on my blog at #thecookeshoneymoon. ☺

A city at night, with many buildings with lights on. One brightly lit tower with yellow lighting stands out amongst the other buildings

On this particular day we started with Tsujiki fish market, catching the train there. There was a fair bit of street food so we took the opportunity to have these mochi (sticky rice pudding) with strawberries, which were much raved about by a couple of well-known YouTubers.

Two separate people’s hands holding pale yellow mochi with a single strawberry on top of each, placed upside-down. The mochi sits on pink napkins.
Yummy mochi

I really wanted a seafood skewer. If I had to pick a favourite street food, I think food on skewers is always my favourite. Relatively easy to eat – compared to other foods where you’re holding paper plates of delicacies that are bound to drop to the ground if you hold your plate at the wrong angle. I got a skewer with prawn, eel and a scallop. It was pricey, for what it was was, but I was really hungry for it!

A white paper plate with a skewer, the skewer has a prawn, piece of eel, and scallop (from top to bottom), and is covered in dark brown sauce
It was worth the price!
A market during the day. Some Japanese signage can be seen on the right side. Many people are walking through the market ahead.
Walking through the fish market
A market during the day, filled with people. Dried octopus is hanging from a stall on the left, and a stand outside with a menu is visible on the right. Lots of power lines can be seen above the stalls and some apartment buildings in the distance.
More of the fish market

After wandering around looking for somewhere to eat, we settled on a place that had chirashi (raw fish on rice), one of my favourite Japanese dishes. Being a fish market, it was safe to assume that most of the eateries had raw fish, or at the very least, fish! We kinda walked around the market a couple times before making a decision. We tried to judge the places based on how busy they looked. In Japan, a busy place or a long line of people usually means that it’s popular for a good reason.

Nick chose aburi (seared) salmon on rice, one of his favourites. He wasn’t a big fan of the roe, though, and never has been. Roe are fish eggs, that look like small globes. I would say they taste like fish oil capsules… that said, I’ve now revealed a horrid part of my childhood where I couldn’t swallow pills and thus chewed on my fish oil capsules… 🤦🏻‍♀️ Do not judge me. Anyway, roe tastes very fishy.

A bowl of cloudly soup with small green onions. There is a lot of dark green wet seaweed in the bowl.
Alllll the seaweed
A black bowl containing rice with lightly grilled salmon. It’s topped with a pea-sized piece of wasabi, orange cod roe that looks like translucent little globes, and yellow pickled ginger.
Nick’s aburi salmon dish

I ordered a bowl of seaweed soup and chose a tuna bowl for my main meal. The seaweed soup was really delicious (I love seaweed). The tuna bowl had three different types of tuna on it, ranging from medium to fatty. I used to be very much obsessed with salmon when I first started eating Japanese food, but now I’m a little over it, and tuna or kingfish is usually my first choice.

A black bowl containing rice with deep red and light pink slices of raw tuna. It’s topped with a soft scoop of pink tuna, yellow pickled ginger, and a pea-sized piece of wasabi.
Alllll the tuna

It may have been almost winter in Japan when we visited, but there was absolutely no shortage of ice cream. People ate ice cream even when it was cold. Nick wanted a caramel flavoured ice cream so he bought one at a stall nearby.

A hand holding a waffle ice cream cone, filled with a swirl of light brown ice cream with golden brown caramel sauce through it
Look at the swirls of caramel sauce through it

We explored the shops in the area of Ginza after that. On the way, we passed a store that had someone dressed up as mascot out front. I didn’t even remember what the store was, I just wanted a photo with the mascot.

A person dressed up in a costume resembling a cat, with brown “hair” and a bright green cap. The costume also comes with a bright green toga and the person is holding a brown staff that has one jagged end.
I really don’t know what this mascot was for.

So I approached and got a photo. I don’t know what it is about mascots but they’re totally boring in Sydney and in Australia in general, but seeing mascots outside of home is fun. I got a photo with someone dressed up as an Oreo once in Singapore. 🍪

A girl in a grey jumper, black skirt and brown boots, smiling, alongside someone dressed in an animal costume. The animal is a bit like a cat with orange fur and white paws, and is wearing a bright green toga and small bright green cap.
Me and the… cat? mascot. It kinda looks like a bear…?

There is a lot of shopping to do in Ginza but we weren’t planning to shop much. We did, however, want to take a look in the biggest Uniqlo store in the world. It had about eight levels and they were fully categorised. After browsing for a bit, that meant that Nick and I had to part ways to look at different clothes, because the mens’ and womens’ clothes were in different areas.

We didn’t plan to really buy anything but we did…!

The inside of a store with wooden floors. Narrow reflective panels alternated with panels of columns of coloured squares make up a wall on the left. Some people are visible in the distance, not too close to the wall.
Inside the Uniqlo store on the first level

Nick tried on some pants, hoping to find something that fit well, but to no avail. He ended up grabbing a cashmere sweater (after I convinced him, haha!). I picked up a few sweaters: a black v-neck, grey v-neck, and a cloudy blue crew-neck. The sweaters were marked down, and we got a tourist discount.

I also grabbed a pair of black tailored ankle pants which have served as an awesome versatile pair of pants since. They can be dressed up or down and the length is perfect for my short height. Although Nick didn’t find any pants that fit, back in Sydney recently he did find some Uniqlo pants that fit him. Win. 🙌

We stopped at a French-inspired café for tea and cake, on the way to Roppongi. Although we didn’t get to explore Roppongi, we did what we’d planned to do, which was to go to the area of Roppongi Hills and to the Mori Tower to see some wonderful views of Tokyo. It was, unfortunately, getting dark, and we had wanted to see the views in daylight. But the views were not so bad after all!

After getting an elevator to the top of the tower, we noticed a lot of photography enthusiasts had their tripods set up, and some people were holding their smartphones right up to the glass to avoid reflections. Whatever, I did that too. 😜

A wide view of a city at night from a high altitude. A long line of different coloured lights shows a road of traffic one side of the photo, moving into the distance.
The opposite view of the city, from the picture at the top of my post.

We were also allowed to go to an open area to see the view. It was really windy and cold but worth it to enjoy the view.

A girl with short dark hair, and boy with dark hair, smiling. It’s nighttime and the lights are on in the buildings that are in the background. There is a tower that stands out with yellow/orange lights.
Me and Nick at the outside area of the tower

Photos in this post were taken by me or Nick on our iPhone 7s.

Although we returned from our honeymoon four months ago, you can see the rest of our honeymoon adventures with the hashtag #thecookeshoneymoon on Twitter (mostly me) or on Instagram (mostly Nick). 💖

Other posts in this series:

 

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